Monday, April 4, 2011

Carbon Sinks

This article focuses on the mass deforestation of the world that has happened over the last 150 years and how this has led to a huge global increase in CO2 build-up. Forests absorb carbon dioxide, making them natural regulators of CO2 in the atmosphere. They can also provide a natural barrier to natural disasters such as over-flowing rivers. As a vital part of many ecosystems, various species rely on forests and vice versa. The main idea presented in this article to reverse this high CO2 build up is the idea of creating “Carbon Sinks.” Reforestation, or planting of new forests, may help with climate change and warming of the earth’s atmosphere. This idea is criticized however because it legitimizes the continued destruction of pristine forests that already have a thriving ecosystem. Industries feel that deforestation would be countered by reforestation; however this is not the case. To create a new forest would mean creating a new ecosystem as well.

I believe in reforestation but not as the perfect fix. First of all, the science behind doing this is not complete. Creating an ecosystem is a lot more complex than originally thought. Second, these “carbon sinks” will store mass amounts of CO2, and if they burn down, this will pollute the air with CO2 which is the opposite of its purpose. A third point is that these carbon sinks will be implemented in countries of low international power. Countries such as Uganda need to improve their own needs and not those of the international power houses such as the United States and Canada. The dominant countries will take advantage of these 3rd world countries which will do nothing but create tension. More needs to be done about carbon emissions rather than thinking newly built forests will counteract deforestation.
--Mike Gnip

2 comments:

  1. I think that replanting these forests is the best thing that people can do with the current technology. I would rather see people making an effort to restore what they have damaged then do nothing at all.

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  2. I think this is a good idea. However I think it should be done on a small scale. Taking out a forest would alter the ecosystem and the animals that live there.

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